Reading, Writing Tips

Jobs For Writers


Writers block

Being a writer is hard work. There are many people will believe in your gift, and others will laugh in your face. I’m sure writers like Stephen King and J. K. Rowling were laughed at, but look at them now! I would LOVE to be on their level one day and even write for Huffington Post or a great company like it. Speaking of writing for a living, I have been applying to several writing jobs.  Now, I’ve worked as a writer before, but I am looking to do so on a full-time basis. If you read my plea for wanting a career as a writer, I was speaking for us all when I said we wanted to make it through our words. There are many jobs out there that writers can do. To name a few:

  • Content Writer
  • Staff Writer
  • Freelance Writer
  • Creative Writer
  • Fiction Writer
  • Screenwriter
  • TV Writer
  • Contributing Writer
  • Blog Writer
  • Journalist
  • Copywriter
  • Technical Writer

These are jobs that I have applied for in various companies. Let’s hope one of these turns out to be a winner. But, if not, I am still writing. My suggestion would be to ALWAYS write. The more you write, the better you will be become in your craft. But, there is one thing a writer should always do as well. That is to:

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A great writer is also a great reader. I LOVE to read as you know if you’ve been seeing my  Goodreads page, and book reviews. I watched a few interviews with Stephen King and he said that he reads all the time. It helps strengthen his writing.

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Writing is already a job within itself, but sometimes we have to get day jobs, too. I used to work full-time, go to school and STILL would write before I went to bed. Lately, I have been writing a lot of samples for the writing jobs that I have been applying for. My point is that writing should always be precedent if it’s something you plan on doing for the rest of your life. As for myself I want to be like Stephen King and just write for a living. In time I have no doubt that it won’t happen. I am going to re-read On Writing by Stephen King just to get inspiration to keep going. This journey can be a lonely road, but I will not stop climbing. If you want a writing job and to continue your own projects, keep striving. Don’t let or allow anyone to tell you differently.

Reading, Write, Writers, Writing, Writing Tips

Excerpt: I’m Your Angel By Krystol


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Coming in August of  2017

Here is an (unedited except)  of my next project. Feel free to give feedback in the comments!

 

“ Angel! I can’t do this with you right now.” I yelled as he was driving through old Baltimore Pike.

“ Miracle, I told you that I was sorry. How many times are you going to continue to punish me?” He yelled back.

The snow was coming down hard and he was speeding. I was scared and my heart started to panic.

“ You had her pussy smell all over you!” I barked back.

“ Mamita, I don’t want us to get a divorce. I am going to get help.” He said.

“ Angel, you had the last time. Just tell me how many more did you fuck?”

“ Miracle, it was just the two times and that was it. I love you and I’m committed to you.” He retorted.

“ How are you committed to me when you fucking cheated twice. We aren’t in high school anymore, Angel.”

I started to cry.

He hated when I cried.

We stopped at a red light and I looked out the window at the Christmas lights. Christtmas was my favorite holiday of the year.

“ Look. I love you. We are not getting divorced. This marriage is going to work and it’s going to last. We had vows, Miracle.”

“ Vows that you broke. Just tell me why? Is it because I work so much?”

“ No. Baby.”

He sighed.

“ She came on to me in the office. I told her I was happily married. We had the Christmas party last year and both were too drunk to drive. She kissed me. I called her Miracle and she played along with it.”

Tears started to roll my down my eyes even harder.

“ Since you were drunk the first time, how the fuck did it happen again?”

This go round I was furious. I wanted to grab the wheel and make him feel the same pain that I am, but I couldn’t kill us.

“ Miracle. Please calm down. I don’t want your asthma to act up.” He said trying to hold my hand.

“ Fuck you and your damn asthma.” I yelled.

“ Please stop crying.” He said as tears started to stream down his eyes.

“ We don’t need this shit.” I said.

“ Who the fuck is we?”

Cars started to pile up behind us and were blowing the horn.

“ Angel, I’m pregnant!”

Before I could say anything he stared at me and his foot hit the gas on the car.

“ Angel, look out!” I screamed.

I could hear the crash, but after that it all went black.

***

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Stephen King ( my favorite author)

Thoughts and Tips: I wrote this prelude with the thought of NEEDING a dramatic beginning in order to grab my readers attention. I hope I did a good job. My style of writing is to always have a problem with a solution. I like to write about things that people can relate. My love is YA then Adult or New Adult as some readers may say. The names Miracle and Angel came to me because I used to have a big crush on someone and I always called him my angel. He never knew that, but it always stuck with me. I look forward to see what Angel and Miracle are going to become. Do you?

 

Reading, Writing Tips

What Helped Me Get Started With Writing


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Hey fellow writers and readers! I am asked this question ALL the time about what got me started with writing. For me, I always enjoyed watching movies. Seeing the way that stories were told fascinated me. I wanted to tell my own stories. Before I started film school, I was writing. Here is what I did.

  1. Writing Utensils: Now, this may sound silly, but I had to figure out what was comfortable for me. Typing on a computer, writing in a notebook, or writing with pen and pencil. At first, it was writing with a pencil. I could always erase the mistakes. As I got older, I went from pen to computer. Now, for you it maybe different, you may want to write everything first in a notebook and then convert to a computer. They even still sell typewriters as well. Figure out what your best writing utensil is.
  2. What to Write: Deciding what to write can be easy for some, but hard to others. You have so many ideas going on in your head. This is totally fine! Write them all down. Get a journal is that just for ideas and ideas alone. I have a small one and let me tell you, it works wonders especially if I am out and about and something just ” pops” in my head.
  3. From Ideas to Story: This part will be the most rewarding yet challenging part. Breathe. Don’t panic. Take it slow. Make an outline or jot notes of what your story is going to be about. This can take a few days up to a couple of weeks. You have to have as much information as possible without going into too much detail. For example check out my character profile blog that will help you.
  4. Once I made the character profile, I was ready to write. The words came to me. It won’t for everyone, so don’t try to rush the process of writing. What worked for me when I got started was a chapter a week. I would re-read over and over and made changes until it was perfect. Don’t do this! You will have time to edit and change things when the story is done. Just write until the story is finish no matter what you think it’s crap or not.
  5. Read. Whether you have been writing for a long time or not, reading will help you. It categorizes the genre you think you want to write in and brings newness all around it. Now, I don’t mean read books and then mimic the same story. What I mean is to read to get perspective. See how other authors write and produce page turners. I love to write fiction in different genres such as contemporary, romance, literature, psychological thrillers, horror and young adult genres. I am ALWAYS reading books.  But, read books on writing as well. I recommend On Writing by Stephen King. He talks about his writing style and how he got started. It is so inspiring.

Check Out These Other Writing Books

 

 

Writing Tips

20 Rules For A Writer by Stephen King


 

 

 

 

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In one of my favorite Stephen King interviews, for The Atlantic, he talks at length about the vital importance of a good opening line. “There are all sorts of theories,” he says, “it’s a tricky thing.” “But there’s one thing” he’s sure about: “An opening line should invite the reader to begin the story. It should say: Listen. Come in here. You want to know about this.” King’s discussion of opening lines is compelling because of his dual focus as an avid reader and a prodigious writer of fiction—he doesn’t lose sight of either perspective:

We’ve talked so much about the reader, but you can’t forget that the opening line is important to the writer, too. To the person who’s actually boots-on-the-ground. Because it’s not just the reader’s way in, it’s the writer’s way in also, and you’ve got to find a doorway that fits us both.

This is excellent advice. As you orient your reader, so you orient yourself, pointing your work in the direction it needs to go. Now King admits that he doesn’t think much about the opening line as he writes, in a first draft, at least. That perfectly crafted and inviting opening sentence is something that emerges in revision, which can be where the bulk of a writer’s work happens.

Revision in the second draft, “one of them, anyway,” may “necessitate some big changes” says King in his 2000 memoir slash writing guide On Writing. And yet, it is an essential process, and one that “hardly ever fails.” Below, we bring you King’s top twenty rules from On Writing. About half of these relate directly to revision. The other half cover the intangibles—attitude, discipline, work habits. A number of these suggestions reliably pop up in every writer’s guide. But quite a few of them were born of Stephen King’s many decades of trial and error and—writes the Barnes & Noble book blog—“over 350 million copies” sold, “like them or loathe them.”

1. First write for yourself, and then worry about the audience. “When you write a story, you’re telling yourself the story. When you rewrite, your main job is taking out all the things that arenot the story.”

2. Don’t use passive voice. “Timid writers like passive verbs for the same reason that timid lovers like passive partners. The passive voice is safe.”

3. Avoid adverbs. “The adverb is not your friend.”

4. Avoid adverbs, especially after “he said” and “she said.”

5. But don’t obsess over perfect grammar. “The object of fiction isn’t grammatical correctness but to make the reader welcome and then tell a story.”

6. The magic is in you. “I’m convinced that fear is at the root of most bad writing.”

7. Read, read, read. ”If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write.”

8. Don’t worry about making other people happy. “If you intend to write as truthfully as you can, your days as a member of polite society are numbered, anyway.”

9. Turn off the TV. “TV—while working out or anywhere else—really is about the last thing an aspiring writer needs.”

10. You have three months. “The first draft of a book—even a long one—should take no more than three months, the length of a season.